Boy Scout Camping

Regional Camping and Events

Camp Shenandoah is a perfect place for many of these activites.

Day Hikes — Reasonably short hikes (three to 10 miles) in terrain without a lot of elevation gain or loss.

Patrol Activities — A Boy Scout patrol or Varsity Scout squad may participate in patrol activities with the permission of its Scoutmaster or Coach and parents/guardians. Appropriate adult leadership must be present for all overnight Scouting activities.

Weekend Overnights — Troops/teams that plan and carry out outings once a month attract and retain boys at a much higher level than those that have fewer outings during the year.

Camporees — In the Boy Scouts of America, districts or councils may hold a camporee once or twice a year. Typically, the camporee involves competitions, with events such as fire building, knot tying, first aid, emergency preparedness, pioneering or orienteering. Some camporees also integrate work on merit badges. The camporee may be centered around a central theme such as living history, horsemanship, aquatics, shooting sports, a historical trail, a service project, and most recently Geocaching. Camporees often have a campfire program with awards and presentations, skits and songs. Camporees also may have a service project that helps the hosting facility. Typical service projects could be pruning trees, spreading mulch or trash pick up.

Summer Camp — Summer camp is what many Scouts enjoy most. Camp programs provide numerous opportunities for Scouts to earn merit badges along their advancement trail. Resident Scout camping includes at least five nights and six days of fun outdoor activities.

National Camping and Events

Jamborees — Every four years, the Boy Scouts of America hosts a national Scout jamboree. More than 40,000 Scouts and leaders from across the country participate in this 10-day event filled with the most popular and highest-quality outdoor activities Scouts enjoy. To participate, a Scout must be at least 12 years of age by July 1 of the jamboree year and be a First Class Scout.

Council High Adventure — A high-adventure experience includes at least five nights and six days of trekking in wilderness and other rugged, remote locations. Trekking may include backpacking, canoeing, mountain biking, horse packing, mountain climbing, ski touring, rafting, kayaking, or a host of other outdoor adventures. Participants must be at least 13 years old by September 1 of the year of participation or a registered Venturer.

National High Adventure — The BSA operates unique and exciting national high-adventure bases and programs. With two locations in the Florida Keys, the Florida National High Adventure Sea Base offers a variety of aquatic and boating programs. The Northern Tier National High Adventure Program, based in northern Minnesota with two satellite bases in Canada, provides a variety of canoe treks and programs. Philmont Scout Ranch, located in the mountains of New Mexico, provides excellent backpacking treks. Age requirements for these programs vary, but most programs are rugged and designed for older Scouts.

Unit High Adventure— The highest level of challenge for a troop or team is to plan and carry out its own highadventure experience. These activities for more experienced Scouts are planned and implemented by youth members with coaching from their adult leaders.